American Dental Association pic

ADA and AAPD Reaffirm Benefit of Early-In-Life Dental Visits

American Dental Association pic

American Dental Association
Image: ada.org

For more than 25 years, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, has served in the Staten Island, New York, area as a pediatric dentist. In conjunction with his dental career, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, maintains membership in the American Dental Association (ADA).

The ADA and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recently issued a joint reaffirmation of their recommendation of early-in-life dentist visits for children as a preventative measure against tooth decay. The two organizations renewed their guidance in response to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics that seemed to show a negligible benefit of preventative dental services for children.

The study’s authors, who admitted that the study’s scope was limited, used data from Alabama children who received preventative dental services through Medicaid. Critics believe the study is flawed because Medicaid data is often entered by people with different training and expertise, and preventative treatment often varies from one provider to the next. In light of these factors, the ADA and AAPD still advise parents to take their children to the dentist before their first birthday, given numerous other studies in recent years that support the benefit of early-life dental visits.

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Oral Hygiene Habits pic

Teaching Important Oral Hygiene Habits to Children

 

Oral Hygiene Habits pic

Oral Hygiene Habits
Image: colgateprofessional.com

Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is the owner of Dentistry for Children, a Staten Island, New York, clinic that has provided dentistry services to children with special needs for more than 25 years. In addition to caring for the teeth of society’s youngest members, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is dedicated to informing parents about safe practices in infant and child oral health.

As a parent, it is important to keep an eye on young children to ensure their mouths remain healthy. Oral health in children relies on not only the activities they should practice regularly, but also the activities they should not:

Children must be taught that while sharing in general is a good skill, they cannot share items that will or have been placed in the mouth. Specifically, toddlers should learn to avoid using utensils and cups that have been used by another child. They also should be dissuaded from placing things that have fallen on the ground into their mouths.

When a child is old enough to begin brushing their own teeth (around age 3), the importance of this regular activity should already have been impressed upon them for a number of years. Parents can help their child prepare for this new task by showing them how to properly angle the brush, encouraging them to be gentle when brushing, and reminding them to brush multiple times a day.

From a very young age, children can begin learning the effect of diet on oral hygiene. High-sugar drinks and snacks can decay teeth, so young children should be taught to eat these foods only in moderation, and to brush well (or ask to have their teeth brushed) after consuming such items.

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry pic

The 2017 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Annual Session

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry pic

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
Image: aapd.org

A Staten Island, New York, dentist for 27 years, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is the owner of Dentistry for Children, a clinic that specializes in dental services for young people with special needs. Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD).

Each year, the AAPD hosts an annual session, at which members and other dental professionals gather to learn more about their field and interact with their peers. AAPD 2017 will take place over four days in May, in National Harbor, Maryland.

Prior to the official launch of the conference, attendees have the opportunity to attend an event supporting the AAPD foundation Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children, as well as a networking breakfast and a preconference course on administering dental care to toddlers.

During the session itself, members can participate in symposia and skill-building workshops, talks, and receptions. An exhibit running throughout the event will offer access to more than 100 exhibitors showcasing their innovative dentistry products, equipment, technology, and services.

The annual session will close on Sunday, May 28, with the President’s Farewell Dinner, held at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.