Glenn J Marie DDS

Oral Health in the U.S. – Children with Financial Disadvantages

Glenn J Marie DDS

Glenn J Marie DDS

Glenn J. Marie, DDS, a pediatric dentist with decades of experience, provides oral health services to children through his Staten Island, New York-based clinic. A provider who gives back to his community, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, donates professional time to financially disadvantaged children in need of dental care.

In the United States, millions of children live in poverty. Recent census puts the problem in sharp relief, reporting that more than 21 percent of American children reside with families earning incomes below the federal poverty level. Put in raw numbers, that percentage constitutes more than 15 million children.

Financially disadvantaged children face a variety of challenges, not the least of which is maintaining oral health. This can have wide-reaching consequences.

For instance, a study focusing on children in North Carolina found that those with financial disadvantages were significantly more likely to stay home from school as a result of dental pain. Another study, this one in Los Angeles, found dental health issues caused more than 30 percent of absences for elementary school children from poorer backgrounds.

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American Dental Association pic

ADA and AAPD Reaffirm Benefit of Early-In-Life Dental Visits

American Dental Association pic

American Dental Association
Image: ada.org

For more than 25 years, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, has served in the Staten Island, New York, area as a pediatric dentist. In conjunction with his dental career, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, maintains membership in the American Dental Association (ADA).

The ADA and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recently issued a joint reaffirmation of their recommendation of early-in-life dentist visits for children as a preventative measure against tooth decay. The two organizations renewed their guidance in response to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics that seemed to show a negligible benefit of preventative dental services for children.

The study’s authors, who admitted that the study’s scope was limited, used data from Alabama children who received preventative dental services through Medicaid. Critics believe the study is flawed because Medicaid data is often entered by people with different training and expertise, and preventative treatment often varies from one provider to the next. In light of these factors, the ADA and AAPD still advise parents to take their children to the dentist before their first birthday, given numerous other studies in recent years that support the benefit of early-life dental visits.

Oral Hygiene Habits pic

Teaching Important Oral Hygiene Habits to Children

 

Oral Hygiene Habits pic

Oral Hygiene Habits
Image: colgateprofessional.com

Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is the owner of Dentistry for Children, a Staten Island, New York, clinic that has provided dentistry services to children with special needs for more than 25 years. In addition to caring for the teeth of society’s youngest members, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is dedicated to informing parents about safe practices in infant and child oral health.

As a parent, it is important to keep an eye on young children to ensure their mouths remain healthy. Oral health in children relies on not only the activities they should practice regularly, but also the activities they should not:

Children must be taught that while sharing in general is a good skill, they cannot share items that will or have been placed in the mouth. Specifically, toddlers should learn to avoid using utensils and cups that have been used by another child. They also should be dissuaded from placing things that have fallen on the ground into their mouths.

When a child is old enough to begin brushing their own teeth (around age 3), the importance of this regular activity should already have been impressed upon them for a number of years. Parents can help their child prepare for this new task by showing them how to properly angle the brush, encouraging them to be gentle when brushing, and reminding them to brush multiple times a day.

From a very young age, children can begin learning the effect of diet on oral hygiene. High-sugar drinks and snacks can decay teeth, so young children should be taught to eat these foods only in moderation, and to brush well (or ask to have their teeth brushed) after consuming such items.

Glenn J Marie DDS pic

Tips for Helping a Child Deal With a Dentist Appointment

Glenn J Marie DDS pic

Glenn J Marie DDS

Glenn J. Marie, DDS, is the owner and primary dentist at Dentistry for Children in Staten Island, New York. The office is especially experienced in helping children with special needs, including autism and Down Syndrome. Glenn J. Marie received a DDS from the New York College of Dentistry.

Taking children to the dentist regularly is a vital part of protecting their dental health. Most children should visit the dentist by his or her first birthday. This first visit is in part designed to help kids get used to visiting the dentist and also to teach parents how to tend to their baby’s teeth. By age two, children should be seeing the dentist every six months. Most children will receive an orthodontic evaluation around age seven, which helps dentists identify the skeletal causes of crooked teeth.

Prior to bringing your child to the dentist, it is a good idea to prepare him or her by discussing what to expect and urging him or her to be excited about the visit. Appointments for children are best held early in the day, when children are alert and fresh. Parents should also be prepared to hold their children in the chairs, especially those who are under 36 months old.

American Academy of Pediatric Dentists pic

The Mouth Monsters Encourage Children to Care for Their Teeth and Gums

American Academy of Pediatric Dentists pic

American Academy of Pediatric Dentists
Image: mouthmonsters.mychildrensteeth.org

The owner of Dentistry for Children in Staten Island, New York, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, helps children develop strong oral hygiene habits and maintain healthy smiles. As part of his commitment to quality patient care, Glenn J. Marie, DDS, holds membership with the American Academy of Pediatric Dentists.

In order to inspire good oral hygiene in small children, the AAPD has created colorful Mouth Monsters to better reach parents and kids. The aptly named Tooth D.K., Tartar the Terrible, and Ginger Bite-Us help parents communicate the dangers of dirty teeth and gums to their little ones. They also remind families of the importance of regular visits to the Super Mouth Monster Fighter, otherwise known as the pediatric dentist.

After reading up on the signs of gum disease and tartar buildup, parents can print out colorful wanted posters of the Mouth Monsters. Designed to fit perfectly on a bathroom mirror, these posters will help children learn the importance of keeping their mouths healthy throughout their lives.